Austin software startup eRelevance raises $1.4 million for growth

Feb 2, 2015
Austin American Statesman

The only time many people talk with their doctor is during their annual checkup or when something goes wrong


Austin startup eRelevance wants to change that with a software service that lets health care providers communicate in automated, personalized conversations through email, texting and a mobile app


Doctors can use the software to share preventative care information, send wellness surveys, follow up on health issues and offer promotions


“Health care providers want to be in touch with their patients, but today they are busier than ever,” said Bob Fabbio, eRelevance co-founder and CEO. “Our service helps doctors engage with their patients, which improves relationships and drives revenue for providers.”


As it prepares to make a sales push, the 18-month-old company said Friday it has raised $1.4 million


The lead investor was Martin Ventures, which is led by Charlie Martin, a health care veteran who founded hospital chain Vanguard Health Systems. Vanguard was recently acquired by Tenet Healthcare for $4.3 billion


The new funding brings the total raised by eRelevance to $2.7 million


Martin said he is backing eRelevance because of the way health care providers have responded to the service


“They see this as a valuable way to maintain communication with the patient without somebody having to do a lot of hands-on work,” Martin said. “I think it’s going to be an effective tool to help with patient retention and in reaching new patients.”


The company offers two HIPAA-compliant services: A patient engagement package, which lets doctors communicate with existing patients and costs $399 per month per doctor; and a patient prospecting package, which helps providers reach new patients and costs $299 per doctor per month


The 14-person company has signed 75 health providers and plans to sign up another 70 providers this quarter, Fabbio said


“Our intention this year is to expand our reach by going beyond individual doctor practices to large hospital systems,” he said



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